Delicious Food and Healing with Traci Weintraub

Gracefully Fed founder Traci Weintraub

She Started A Soup Company To Heal Her Lyme 

Traci Weintraub is a cook, author, and Lyme warrior whose diagnosis and battle with Lyme inspired her to build an immuno-supportive lifestyle that is just as delicious as nutritious. She created Gracefully Fed to spread her recipes and healthy approach to delicious food and meals. Gracefully Fed is organic gluten and dairy-free soupery that offers local pickup in LA and nationwide shipping. Her brand mission is inspired by her healing journey and the desire to heal her chronic symptoms while maintaining a happy and not a limited lifestyle.

Tune in to hear about Traci’s journey from Lyme diagnosis to Gracefully Fed, the habits she had to break and relearn to heal, and why nutrition is such a pivotal component to beating chronic pain and supporting your immune system.

Gracefully Fed is also offering Lyme 360 readers and Heal Podcast listeners a special discount code to use on the Gracefully Fed website .

Use code LYME360GF to save on your order. They recently launched their Detox Box so make sure to check it out!

Traci’s Journey From Lyme to Delicious Food Recipes

Mimi MacLean:
Traci, thank you so much for coming on today. I’m excited to hear about your company, and I would love to start with just your Lyme journey if you don’t mind.

Traci Weintraub:
Sure. Like when I look back at it now, I had moved to New York, and I was having all these symptoms, but blowing it off and basically saying like, oh, I’m getting older. Like that’s what I thought it was. So I moved back to New York, and I was like taking the subway or walking around Central Park, like, man, like my legs are hefty. Like, I must not be used to walking, like, cause I lived in LA for so long, which is bizarre. I’m a New Yorker. So like…

 Mimi MacLean:
Right.

Traci Weintraub:
I started getting migraines. I went to a migraine specialist while living in New York, which always aggravates me when I tell this story because they did a scan, and you know, you go to the doctor, they say, you’re fine. Like you rationalize anything and everything.

Traci Weintraub:
You just have migraines. And they give you medicine. Many years later, I looked at that scan, and on the bottom, it said possible Lyme disease. Like yeah.

 Mimi MacLean:
On a scan. And it didn’t, and they didn’t catch it.

Traci Weintraub:
No one told me. But you know, as you become like a Lyme advocate and advocate for yourself, you start asking for all of your…

 Mimi MacLean:
Records.

Traci Weintraub:
…medical records. And then, ultimately, I was getting migraines. I had really heaviness in my legs. I started to develop stomach pains, but I attributed this to stress or moving to New York after living in LA for 10 years. I was really depressed. I just also thought maybe I missed LA. I got a call to move back to LA to be on a TV show, and I was like, all right, great. I’m done with New York; I’ve been here for two years. Love my family, but see ya, I’m going back to LA.

Traci Weintraub:
And as soon as I landed in LA, I would say that I started getting POTS symptoms within three weeks. And then from there, it was like, something’s off. I started collapsing, and ultimately they diagnosed me with postural orthostatic tachycardia. And it wouldn’t be for seven months until I was diagnosed with Lyme.

 Mimi MacLean:
Wow. What else causes POTS besides Lyme?

Traci Weintraub:
You know, actually COVID, they’re saying like long haul COVID patients are actually getting POTS, but this is something that was said to me via like a Facebook Lyme group. I was asking about POTS, and somebody reached out to me privately. I never met her like just a stranger. And she said POTS is a syndrome, a disease that causes it.

So it’s a dysfunction of your autonomic nervous system, and it’s out of whack, and something is causing that, and they don’t tell you that. Find your disease. It was like the scariest thing you could ever hear, but it’s the truth. They just say, well, you have POTS. So any other symptom, they just kept throwing it under the rug. But ultimately, there is a disease that is causing that dysfunction.

 Mimi MacLean:
So who ultimately diagnosed you with Lyme?

Traci Weintraub:
I went to an integrative gastroenterologist. His name’s Dr. Rahbar; he tends to try to get to the root of the problem.

 Mimi MacLean:
And he’s in LA.

Traci Weintraub:
And he’s in LA. I’ve been to so many doctors, and you know, we thought, okay, I’ll get a concierge doctor. Like we, you just don’t know. And then I had a… I just kept having symptoms. And that concierge doctor kept saying like, no, it’s POTS, you’re fine. And then I ultimately had two really, really bad allergic reactions to nuts, which I had never been allergic to. And I’m like, this is wrong.

 Mimi MacLean:
Yeah.

delicious food recipes

Traci Weintraub:
And so my sister, I think is the one who said, you should go to like one of those house doctors, like, you know, that show House where he likes figures out, like what’s going on. I found Dr. Rahbar. I went to him, the first thing he said was, I think you have Lyme disease. And I said, no, I’ve been tested. And he goes, we’re going to test you in another way.

 Mimi MacLean:
How did he test you?

Traci Weintraub:
IGeneX.

 Mimi MacLean:
Yeah, the IGeneX test.

Traci Weintraub:
I always say this to everybody, like if you’re going to get tested for Lyme, even if it’s a western blot. Get tested for co-infections.

 Mimi MacLean:
They say co-infections that caused the damage, not the Lyme.

Traci Weintraub:
Lyme is easier to get rid of the co-infections, and once you treat everything, your body’s in shambles. So…

 Mimi MacLean:
Yeah.

Traci Weintraub:
But yeah. Oh my God, he sent me to Lyme doctors. He did say. [crosstalk 00:05:55]

 Mimi MacLean:
He didn’t even treat me. He didn’t even treat you. He sent you somewhere else.

Traci Weintraub:
He didn’t treat me, you know. He was helping me with a lot of the digestion issues that I was having. But he, he was like, you’re going to have to see a Lyme literate doctor. He recommended somebody that I went to. It was a terrible experience. She didn’t tell me that I should titrate anything. She gave me many antibiotics like, you know, things like Alinia and like strong Amoxicillin, Mepron. I didn’t know you had a titrate, so I was taking all of that at once. She didn’t explain it to me. I ended up in the hospital, and I was like, that’s it.

Mimi MacLean:
Yeah.

Traci Weintraub:
So I ended up seeing somebody else in LA who, you know, we started IVs, we did many IVs. I stayed on antibiotics for a while. And with the IVs, I still wasn’t… nothing was helping. And I didn’t understand anything, and I had made an appointment with my current doctor, Dr. Steven Bach. And I tried to cancel because I was so sick and it was so late. They were like. We’re going to have to charge you. And at that point, I’m like, all right, I’ll just go. And I went, and he made one recommendation. He oversaw everything I was doing, but he recommended UVLrx, which changed the game.

 Mimi MacLean:
What is that? I haven’t heard that.

Traci Weintraub:
It’s light therapy.

 Mimi MacLean:
Oh, that made it sound like you were taking a supplement. Yes. I know exactly what you’re talking about. The UVL…..

Traci Weintraub:
Yeah. I mean, I tried everything. I had tried ozone, I tried…

 Mimi MacLean:
And that didn’t work.

Traci Weintraub:
Not. No, ozone didn’t work for me. I did vitamin C, Meyers, I did glutathione pushes. I did everything, and then I did; I did all that for like a year and a half. And then I started, I think I did about 20 to 30 sessions of UVLrx, which was like an hour of IVs, and then I did extra IVs. Like I did my saline, I did my glutathione. I did anything that like may potentially help, but the UVLrx put me on a different path.

 Mimi MacLean:
That’s great.

Traci Weintraub:
I like got my energy back; the pain wasn’t as bad. And so I switched over to herbals, but that knocked me out. Like that ended up really screwing with me. And then I had gone to see… the herbals ended up lowering my white blood count so much so that I ended up having to see an oncologist. And the oncologist was like; you need to stop taking what you’re taking. And as soon as I did, my white blood cell started to come [crosstalk 00:08:20] back up again.

 Mimi MacLean:
That’s crazy that it was hurting your white blood cells.

Traci Weintraub:
Yeah. And I’m the one who noticed it. I was in the hospital. I was really sick and looked at my… when they hand you your charts when they’re like checking you out. I’m like. I said to the doctor, I’m like my white blood cell count is meager. And he’s like, it’s literally like, it was like 1.9. He’s like, if it were 1.8, we would keep you here. But it was like at 1.9 or something like that. And so then I called Dr. Rahbar. And Dr. Rahbar was like, I think it’s time you need to see an oncologist. And I was like, what? And I went and I was on, I think Byron White’s maybe.

 Mimi MacLean:
Oh yeah. And it’s weird. I’ve never heard that reaction before.

Traci Weintraub:
Yeah. I think I’ve become so sensitive to everything. 

 Mimi MacLean:
I agree. Yeah.

Traci Weintraub:
Like ibuprofen will put me to bed and I… any doctor I’ll say that too. It’s almost like they don’t hear me because I’m like, no, no, I’m so sensitive. So like one in the morning… supplements, I don’t need to take like three a day. Like I’m telling you one a day might be fine for me.

 Mimi MacLean:
What ultimately got you kind of… Where are you now in your process?

Traci Weintraub:
I would like to say I’m in remission, but even when I say that I have so many like hormonal issues that like, you know, I’m very functional. I walk and I run and I’m active, which I wasn’t for four years.

 Mimi MacLean:

So you can run, you could do like, could you do a SoulCycle class or something like that?

Traci Weintraub:
I could, however, like anything that’s like jumping, like my ovaries are like, no, we’re going just to burst. Sorry, don’t do it. 

 Mimi MacLean:
Oh wow.

Traci Weintraub:
Because I developed endometriosis, PCOS, like melasma, like I developed all sorts of hormonal issues after Lyme. But I would say I’m in remission with flares. And I always say, I have good days, bad moments, you know?

 Mimi MacLean:
Yeah, I understand.

Traci Weintraub:
Like I just had an ovarian cyst rupture like a few weeks ago. And I’m just like..

Changing Her Diet and Getting Into Remission

 Mimi MacLean:
So what ultimately you think besides the UV… anything else that you would say… The food? I mean right, that’s why we’re talking.

Traci Weintraub:
Food, food is huge. I, you know, and that was something that was like, I was super stubborn about, like, I was like, I’m not changing my diet. Like I need to live. Like, that was, I couldn’t socialize anymore. I couldn’t run, which I ran… I was a runner. I’m like, well, I’m not changing my diet, I need to live. And when I ultimately was like, you get to a point and I’m sure you have, and other people you’ve interviewed. You get to a point where you’re like, I’m doing anything [crosstalk 00:10:47].

 Mimi MacLean:
And everything.

Traci Weintraub:
To make myself feel better.

 Mimi MacLean:
Yeah.

Traci Weintraub:
So Dr. Rahbar was like, you need to cut out all of these things. And I did for two years, I didn’t drink sugars, grains, eggs, nuts, seeds…

 Mimi MacLean:
Pretty much everything, coffee, [crosstalk 00:11:00] alcohol.

Traci Weintraub:
Everything. Right? Like, you’re like, what do I eat?

 Mimi MacLean:
Vegetables and fruits and some meat.

Traci Weintraub:
Not even like fruit. Like you can have berries, but not bananas.

 Mimi MacLean:
Yeah. Yeah. Yeah.

Traci Weintraub:
I never say that was a cure. I always say it helps. It’s not a miracle.

 Mimi MacLean:
No, But it gets you to a point where like, you can get out of bed and…

Traci Weintraub:
I don’t think you can get better without doing that.

 Mimi MacLean:
But that’s not going to get you better.

Traci Weintraub:
No. And I mean like, occasionally, like I’ll have a drink now. And I know that, like, I can’t drink red wine. 

 Mimi MacLean:
Yeah, I know.

Traci Weintraub:
That will get my heart beating. I could drink certain like white wines, but generally I have to be very careful. But the only thing I could drink now is like tequila, like an organic.

 Mimi MacLean:
Yeah, cause its clean.

Traci Weintraub:
And I feel like a weirdo. Like it’s… Like, this is a… [crosstalk 00:11:46]

 Mimi MacLean:
Good thing it so trendy right now.

delicious food soup recipe

Traci Weintraub:
It’s so trendy, especially in LA, like, but the… and then I also, this is something that I always talk about. Like, I was really skeptical about it because I don’t know. I’m not a person who, you know, I was a runner and lifted weights my entire life. So yoga, meditation, all those things to me were boring and I don’t do. And so a friend recommended going to a healer, like an energy healer. And at the time I was also seeing a kinesiologist, like a muscle tester, which helped like, you know, they help with supplements, which I kind of like, everything was helping, but I wasn’t breaking that plateau. And I went to the healer and he ultimately is what got me over that hump. And I… [crosstalk 00:12:36]

 Mimi MacLean:
What kind of healer was he? Was he teaching you or was he kind of like talking like about like your past lives or what was he ultimately…

Traci Weintraub:
I always say, never know what he does. Like I lay on a table and then we talk. And so I always say it’s better than therapy because he has all these wonderful, like, positive ways to look at things and approach things. Whereas like, if you went to a therapist, they were like, do you think it may be your fault? And you’re like, what? [Crosstalk 00:13:03].

 Mimi MacLean:
Yeah, or lets talk about your past and talk about everything that’s wrong with your past.

Traci Weintraub:
He definitely taught me how to break patterns, which we fall into, especially when you’re sick. You fall into this anxious cycle of like, when you start to get pain again, you’re like, oh my God, what’s this? Like, I need to do ABCDEFG where it’s like, now I could say like, when I had the ruptured cyst and I was in New York, like, there’s a level of calmness that I never had where I could say I’ve been here before.

Traci Weintraub:
I just have to go through the steps and like get through it. So… [Crosstalk 00:13:38].

 Mimi MacLean:
Yeah.

Traci Weintraub:
And that’s something that he helped with, for sure.

Starting Her Soup Company and Focusing on Delicious Food Recipes

gracefully fed creator Traci Weintraub

Mimi MacLean:
Talk to me about like, were you a chef before you started this? Like, what did you do before.

Traci Weintraub:
I worked in TV. I was what they called the video switcher. I live edited for studio audiences, like mainly sitcom television.

 Mimi MacLean:
Oh, wow. Okay. That’s cool.

Traci Weintraub:
I just liked cooking and having dinner parties.

 Mimi MacLean:
You do like to cook in general? Before…

Traci Weintraub:
Loved it.

 Mimi MacLean:
Okay.

Traci Weintraub:
Yeah. Like, and I loved cooking, like really rich, unhealthy, like my friends are going to leave my dinner party and be like, that was the best meal I had.

 Mimi MacLean:
Yeah. Like a Ina Garten, like Gardner, whatever her name is like those yummy meals that are just all butter.

Traci Weintraub:
Oh my God. Yeah. Like how can I make truffle mac and cheese from scratch? Like I was like, I got to perfect this. And I love baking. I loved, I loved it all. So it threw me for a loop when I changed my diet, cause I was like, how do I… I ended up losing a lot of weight because I didn’t know how to cook healthy. And then you’re tired, so you don’t want to like, think about how to cook.

 Mimi MacLean:
Right.

Traci Weintraub:
So my mom actually flew out when I was really, really ill. I was emaciated and we’re like, how do you put on weight? And like, I worked for 12, 14 hours a day. And I was..

 Mimi MacLean:
You’re still working during this whole time.

Traci Weintraub:
So in my mind, if I had told anybody, they wouldn’t have asked me to come back on a new show. I would have lost my insurance. I would have lost my jobs. I worked freelance. Like you’re just hustling for jobs as a freelance.

 Mimi MacLean:
How did you get through the today though?

Traci Weintraub:
I always say this and it always like makes me a little emotional. I worked on a show called Mike and Molly when all this was going on. And there were a few women who worked on that show that I never told. And then I had to tell, because I collapsed one time and they were like, we’re not going to tell the producers. We got you. And then I work up stairs in a booth with all these like sound guys. They’re like in their fifties, sixties, all have kids and they always looked out for me. So like I would between rehearsals, I would sleep on the couch. And when it was like my time to do my job, they would always wake me up and be like, Trace, you’re up. Like they had my back and we just kept it a secret and they never knew fully what was going on, but they knew something was up. And so like whenever I see them, I’m always like, oh my God.

 Mimi MacLean:
That’s awesome. So, okay. So at what point did you say, okay, I’m quitting my job and I’m starting this food company.

Traci Weintraub:
I never quit. So…

 Mimi MacLean:
I know.

Traci Weintraub:
So I worked in TV. I was on a show called “One Day at a Time”, still working in TV and the pandemic shut us down. So I had opened my shop already.

 Mimi MacLean:
Oh.

Traci Weintraub:
And we were functioning all that stuff. And I only worked on that show two days a week. We got shut down and then we ultimately got canceled. And so I started cooking full time, but during the pandemic, I got a few phone calls to come back and do pilots. I was like, not yet. Like I was just scared to get back on set, so I haven’t been back yet. But yeah. So the pandemic is the reason I’m full time cooking.

 Mimi MacLean:
Oh, that’s great.

Traci Weintraub:
Yeah.

 Mimi MacLean:
I guess that’s good. Right? I mean, it seems like you’re happy…

Traci Weintraub:
It’s great. It was a blessing in disguise because it would have been tough if they didn’t have it during this. It actually is like PTSD, like I’m sure, you know, like when you’re sick, you’re home, you’re isolated, you’re by yourself. And then with the pandemic that brings you back to like something you’re like, I’m never doing again. And I’m 3000 miles away from my family and you are isolated, you know, I’m not taking any risks. And it really just brought me back to when I was initially sick with Lyme.

 Mimi MacLean:
Tell us about about your company? Do you mostly just make soup or do you make other stuff as well?

Traci Weintraub:
We make other stuff. So mainly we have like 34 varieties of soup, all organic dairy free, gluten free.

Traci Weintraub:
But as I said, like, I love to cook. So we do a meal delivery service and we put out a menu every week and you could pick it up in store or we could deliver it to you. And I like to bake, so finding recipes without refined sugar has been tricky, but I love it. And when I find a recipe, that’s good, we sell it in the kitchen. Like I made strawberry cupcakes and I’m like super excited about it.

 Mimi MacLean:
Yum.

Traci Weintraub:
So yeah. So it’s kind of like…

 Mimi MacLean:
And what do you ship all over the place? Everything or just the soups or…

Traci Weintraub:
We ship our soups and our vegan chocolate chip cookies nationwide. And our meals are local to California. Yeah.

 Mimi MacLean:
Oh, that’s awesome.

Traci Weintraub:
It’s exciting. It’s fun. And I love food and it’s been an education in itself. Like I’ve never thought I would be in this industry and I love it.

 Mimi MacLean:
Do you ever cheat?

Traci Weintraub:
Not with gluten or dairy, but occasionally like I’ll have like a cookie with refined sugar. Yes.

 Mimi MacLean:
Right. So what would happen if you had gluten? You don’t even know.

Traci Weintraub:
I don’t even know, I know that’s not true. I had a slice of pizza when I was in New York. It was like, after my ruptured cyst, I’m like, you know what, screw it. I haven’t had pizza in like six years. And so I had one with my brother and like, I’m waiting for something to happen. Nothing happened. But if I have dairy, I have pain. Like I get terrible inflammation.

Figuring Out Where Pain Comes From and Detoxing

 Mimi MacLean:
You know, trying to figure out where your pain comes from. Cause I still have pain, even though I feel pretty good. I don’t think I could work out. I feel pretty good. Like I’m back to normal, but I do have terrible pain and just weird things around my body that I’m like, [inaudible 00:19:02] I grew.

 Mimi MacLean:
And it hurts you. Yeah, it’s amazing to think… Cause I look at like times where I’m like in so much pain, I’m like, it’s because I’m cheating a lot. And then my husband would say, well, when, when did you felt the best? And I was like, to be honest with you, I felt the best when I went like on a two week only vegetable diet, you know, or a cleanse or something like that. And like, you really do feel better.

Traci Weintraub:
I’m just like, I’m launching that this week, a detox reset. And like it’s not a weight loss thing. It’s kind of just how I ate. Like when I was in the thick of it, I think I feel the best when I like getting back to the basics. I had bone broth every morning I made smoothies. I didn’t include bananas. And then like, everything I ate was like, quinoa, tomatoes, cucumbers, like straightforward stuff.

Traci Weintraub:
So I’m actually launching that this week at the shop because I need to do it. Like I need to reset. You tend to like get into..

 Mimi MacLean:
Yeah.

Traci Weintraub:
Like, I’m healthy, I’m a healthy eater. But then I find myself eating lentil chips, which is not good for you, but you’re just like, well, I won’t splurge.

 Mimi MacLean:
They’re lentil chips.

Traci Weintraub:
Yeah, there lentil. It’s fine or even lentil pasta. Which…

 Mimi MacLean:
And how long was that for… the little bit… How long did you do that cleanse for?

Traci Weintraub:
I’m doing it for three days, but I probably, once I do it for three days, I could keep going. Like it never bothers me. I just needed like a kickstart…

 Mimi MacLean:
Yup.

Traci Weintraub:
To like kind of get me back into it and once I’m back into it, it’s summer, you have so much fresh produce everywhere. It’s so easy.

 Mimi MacLean:
That’s great.

Traci Weintraub:
But sometimes like you just need like a guide, like on a Sunday you have to write everything out. But this is what worked for me. Like to kind of…

 Mimi MacLean:
Feel better.

Traci Weintraub:
I had a blueberry smoothie every single morning and I had bone broth for like three months straight. Just had a shot of it to like, for my gut.

 Mimi MacLean:
And what was in your blueberry smoothie?

Traci Weintraub:
I literally would just put frozen blueberries, coconut milk, collagen and ice.

 Mimi MacLean:
That’s it.

Traci Weintraub:
That’s it. Like, I didn’t want to do bananas. Cause like they scare the shit out of you. They’re just like bananas are the worst thing.

 Mimi MacLean:
Well, it’s funny. I had a shake last week and it was like banana. I was literally in bed for like an hour. It made me go to sleep, I was exhausted.

Traci Weintraub:
Yeah.

 Mimi MacLean:
The sugar high.

Traci Weintraub:
The sugar, and they said, if you’re going to eat bananas, they can’t be ripe. And I’m like, well then what’s the point. [crosstalk 00:21:12]

 Mimi MacLean:
What’s the point, that’s crazy. I know that’s the thing is cause like everyone loves that Medical Medium, which is great. I’ve heard so many good things about it, but he is banana heavy.

Traci Weintraub:
Well, that’s like I tried his thing. I did celery juice for like three months, two I tried that. I never, it didn’t really do anything for me. Like I was trying to get my Epstein-Barr numbers lower. And so I was like super excited. I’m going to do this for three months and they didn’t move, they didn’t budge. And then I was like, I’m sick of it. I actually… part of my reset, I made a celery soup. That to me is easier than doing the juice.

 Mimi MacLean:
Yeah.

Traci Weintraub:
Just cause it has, I hate saying it, it has a little bit more flavor.

How She Runs Her Company and Her Advice For Lyme Warriors

gracefully fed worker

 Mimi MacLean:
Being a.. You know, into like I have another podcast called “The Badass CEO”, so that you know where I interview women who start businesses.

Traci Weintraub:
I love that.

 Mimi MacLean:
So just that hat I want to put on for a second. So how did you logistically figure out how to send all of your soups and products across the country? You know, like, are they fresh? Are they frozen? Like, how are you logistically doing that?

Traci Weintraub:
We freeze them. We flash freeze everything and it’s also like, I knew nothing. Like everything..

 Mimi MacLean:
Right.

Traci Weintraub:
That I did was like you just do your research and it’s almost like you get experienced doing that with Lyme because all we do is research. We research for ourselves, you advocate for yourself. So like with this, it was the same thing. I had no idea what I was doing. I great mentors, like my dad is a great businessman, but like, he’s like, I don’t know anything about food. So I started just asking questions and I, when I moved from my cooking in my kitchen to a shared kitchen. There was this, like, there were so many women companies, like we all shared the kitchen and I would be like, Hey I’m Traci, how do you do this?

Traci Weintraub:
And I was scattered and I knew nothing, but they did. And so you learned from them, like I met my friend, Maya who ships nationwide, her Brazilian treats. She taught me how to ship and the owner of that kitchen taught me how to like, you know, kind of branch out. But ultimately one of my employees with the shipping, for example, her parents worked at FedEx and I was like, oh, can they put us in touch with somebody there that like we could pick their brain. And that happened within a week…

 Mimi MacLean:
That’s great.

Traci Weintraub:
And then we had a rep for FedEx and I mean, it was just kind of like [crosstalk 00:23:22] the luck of the draw.

 Mimi MacLean:
And then, how have you gotten your name out? As far as like growing your business?

Traci Weintraub:
A good friend of mine who I watched the bachelorette with, she was going through postpartum. I was going through Lyme. I would bring over soup to eat.

Traci Weintraub:
And then she asked me if I could bring her over some. And then she kept asking me for batches. She was putting herself like on an accountability program. And so she started this business of like helping her friends. Like she started with friends, like losing postpartum weight and just keeping themselves accountable for like working out all this stuff. So I randomly got a phone call. Hi, I’m Lily, can I get seven soups? I’m like what I had, like, it didn’t, it didn’t make sense. So anyway, she started this business and she would recommend her clients to me. And then ultimately she did a reality television show and that just, it skyrocketed and you know, she was always, one of my closest friends. It was never like, okay, you know, cut me a check. It was always like, I got you.

Traci Weintraub:
Like, you’re my best friend. I support you. And she knew that this was giving me a new focus.

 Mimi MacLean:
Right.

Traci Weintraub:
So like, it was kind of like, I mean, it was a blessing. She literally was just like, all right, Traci is like coming out of just stopping, talking about Lyme and this gave me something to do and she knew it and she just kind of kept pushing me and ultimately got me that head start…

 Mimi MacLean:
That’s awesome.

Traci Weintraub:
Yeah. That I needed.

 Mimi MacLean:
That’s great. That’s great. This has been amazing. I’m excited to try your stuff to go online and to get it shipped. I used to live in LA, I don’t know if you realize that and I just moved. So I’m bummed. Cause I would have had the delivery center right here, you know, but I’ll just have to go online and do that instead. So, and you also have a great Instagram account as well.

Traci Weintraub:
It’s gracefullyfed_.

 Mimi MacLean:
Yeah. Perfect. This has been amazing. Thank you so much, Traci. I really appreciate it. And I hope you continued success with your business.

Traci Weintraub:
Oh my God. Thank you so much. And thank you for having me. It’s just so great.

Mimi MacLean:
If you want to learn how to detox and check out my detox for Lyme checklist, go to lyme360.com/detoxchecklist. You can also join our community at Lyme360 Warriors on Facebook, and let’s heal together. Thank you. 

Episode Sponsor

Vital Plan Ad Picture

Dr. Rawls is a trusted MD whose life was upended by Lyme but was able to heal himself and use his experience to help others on their journeys battling Lyme. He is the author of Unlocked Lyme and the founder of Vital Plans, a supplement line made of herbs that supports the immune system (made especially for Lyme warriors). Dr. Rawls offers a free online survey that can help you get the right supplement protocol and be on the track to a healthier life. Go to lyme360.com/DrRawls to learn more about the amazing herbal protocol I have been using. 

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